Drexler Joins Nanotronics

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    • Drexler Joins Nanotronics

      Nanotronics just announced a new feature added to their atomically-precise 3-D microscope.  They also announced the Eric Drexler joined their advisory board.  I take the latter as a pretty firm endorsement that they are on the critical path to APM.  Here is a link to a brief article about it:

      http://www.virtual-strategy.com/2015/04/24/nanotronics-imaging-introduces-nvisible™-virtual-reality-technology-enabling-3d-virtual-e#axzz3YNGZNk7A

      Steve

      Steven C. Vetter

      President, Molecular Manufacturing Enterprises, Inc.

      4105 Countryview Drive

      Eagan, MN 55123

       

      SVetter@MMEI.com

      (651) 285-4299

      Steven C. Vetter

      President, Molecular Manufacturing Enterprises, Inc.

      4105 Countryview Drive

      Eagan, MN 55123

       

      SVetter@MMEI.com

      (651) 285-4299

    • That's interesting since Drexler had this comment on SPM manipulation in "Radical Abundance":

      "Because of the limitations of scanning probe methods (slow, and currently limited to arranging atoms and molecules in two dimensions), I find it difficult to imagine attractive scanning probe– based paths that would lead to advanced AP fabrication. Solution-phase molecular self-assembly, by contrast, already enables three-dimensional AP fabrication on a scale of millions of atoms and in production lots measured in billions. This approach has great appeal. Indeed, from the start, self-assembly is the line of research that I have advocated as a path toward APM-level technologies. The comparatively meager state of the art in nudging molecules with scanning probe microscopes has been a distraction."

      Drexler, K. Eric (2013-05-07). Radical Abundance: How a Revolution in Nanotechnology Will Change Civilization (p. 186). PublicAffairs. Kindle Edition.

      (In my humble opinion "Radical Abundance" is mostly of value to newcomers; those with a historical bent may find Drexler's view of why and how the last few decades unfolded the way the did with respect to nanotech progress may also find it of some interest. Otherwise "Engines of Creation" seems to be the better intro.)